22 / April
22 / April
Last of the Mohicans, First of the Cantabrigians

Turning the tables remains the first refuge of liars called on their mendacity. "I was hurt," Elizabeth Warren relays in her new autobiography about charges that she faked Indian ancestry, "and I was angry." What about the law professor she took a spot from? Does she get to be angry, too? Read my column @ the American Spectator that posits that if a blue-eyed blonde can convince herself that she belongs to Sequoia's tribe, then she can convince herself that her popularity at Harvard College will translate to popularity in the Electoral College.

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15 / April
15 / April
The Bombs Heard Round the World, the Shot Heard Round the World

Patriots' Day served as a sports holiday for me growing up: running an annual 5K, cheering on Bill Rogers from Chestnut Hill, and working at the unusual a.m. game at Fenway Park. Last year, when two jerks set off bombs at the Boston Marathon, patriots again defined the day. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports juxtaposing the patriots one year ago and the patriots 238 years before that.

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14 / April
14 / April
Awopbopaloobopalopbamboom Doesn't Belong in a Museum

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted Kiss, Peter Gabriel, Nirvana, Cat Stevens, and others into its club on Thursday. Bands complain that they've been kept out. They should complain that rock's been kept behind display cases and velvet ropes as though it were an artifact rather than a living art form. Read my column @ the American Spectator on why the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is as rock and roll as Up with People covering Air Supply.

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Brendan Eich, Michael Sam, and the Mental Gymnastics of Anti-Bigotry Crusaders

Michael Sam prefers football; his defenders, mental gymnastics. When anonymous voices within the NFL suggested that the openly-gay football might present a culture clash with the locker room, Frank Bruni and Michelangelo Signorile cried "bigot." Now that Brendan Eich has been forced out of Mozilla for supporting a pro-traditional marriage ballot initiative several years ago, Signorile, Bruni, and others celebrate a victory for tolerance because the CEO beliefs clashed with those dominant in Silicon Valley. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on the self-righteousness, hypocrisy, and amoral ends-justify-the-means ethics of the bigots crusading against "bigotry."

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13 / April
13 / April
What the Ultimate Warrior Taught Me About Life While Lifting Weights

My friend the Ultimate Warrior passed away last week. About ten years ago, we spent a memorable morning working out at Gold's Gym, where his voice and personality played louder than his in-ring persona. Unlike the bombast he generally projected, Warrior worked out with an emphasis on form and not flash. Rather than grunt through the repetitions by putting three plates on the barbell, the former WWF champion put one on and ensured that he performed the movement perfectly. Read my remembrance @ Breitbart Sports on how is obsession with weight-room form--doing things right rather than doing things for show--works as a metaphor for his too-short life.

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10 / April
10 / April
Caillou Is Child Abuse

Texans running back Arian Foster hates Caillou. So do I. If PBS played Faces of Death instead of Caillou it would be healthier for three-year-olds. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on how Caillou is a Canadian/PBS plot to slowly transform Americans into a nation of whiners.

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Labor Unions Will Save Collegiate Athletics Like They Saved Detroit

Labor unions seek to organize Northwestern, Duke, and Stanford athletes the way they once organized Flint, Gary, and Paterson workers. Who could possibly object? Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on how the plan to formally professionalize amateur athletics through the formation of labor unions will kill college sports.

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07 / April
07 / April
John Wooden, The Man Who Owned Ten Tournaments

John Calipari tries to win his second NCAA basketball title tonight. John Wooden won ten. Wooden railed against passing where one wasn't looking, rarely traveled to recruit players, forbade water during practices, and largely refrained from coaching during games. Yet, a man whose physiognomy screamed anachronism ushered college basketball into the modern age. Read my review of Seth Davis's Wooden: A Coaches Life @ Breitbart Sports.

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05 / April
05 / April
Ever Get the Feeling You've Been Cheated?

The esteemed philosopher and dental hygienist Johnny Rotten long ago asked, "Ever get the feeling you've been cheated?" From David Ortiz's staged-spontaneity presidential selfie to the president's April Fool's claim that 7.1 million Americans had signed up for ObamaCare, manipulation plays as a sad staple of modern life. Read my column @ the American Spectator on how lies dehumanize their tellers and hearers.

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Barack vs. Big Papi

Barack Obama invited the World Series champions to the White House Tuesday to generate positive press coverage. The MVP of the World Series instead used the visit to generate positive cash flow. It's too bad David Ortiz manipulated the president into a Samsung product endorsement. It's worse that politicians manipulate athletes into a sort of political endorsement by using them for photo ops when they win championships. Read my piece @ Breitbart Sports on how Ortiz's selfie photo-op reverses the traditional exploitation of athletes by politicians.

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03 / April
03 / April
Editor at Breitbart Sports

If you haven't figured it out already, I am the newish editor at Breitbart Sports. I've been writing for twenty years. For the last two, I have been preoccupied with the controversy surrounding football. Just like with my book Intellectual Morons, the "noble lies" involving the gridiron have suckered me in to a debate in order to refute them. They're awfully recalcitrant falsehoods, so I've been mired in this conversation for longer than expected. My foray into football has led to a more lasting stay that includes broader sports writing. If you caught my coverage from Super Bowl week, or at UFC 169, you probably sensed that I had evolved from a dabbler to a regular sports scribe. I will still share my thoughts on politics from time to time here. Every Friday, the American Spectator runs my musings on pop culture. But my main focus will be on sports. If you're interested in my writings, be sure to head over to Breitbart Sports. Increasingly, sports intersects with politics, pop culture, and more, so even if you're not interested in athletics you might be interested in Breitbart Sports.

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31 / March
31 / March
The Rise, Fall, and Strange Rebirth of Music Videos

More than a decade after MTV effectively ditched music videos, and almost a quarter century since their last album, the Pixies have released the best music video of the post-MTV era for a song called "Snakes." What a very oddball, Pixies thing to have done. Read my column @ the American Spectator on YouTube picking up where MTV left off.

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26 / March
26 / March
ESPN and the Politicization of Sports

An article by ESPN's ombudsman asked, "Give Fans What They Want, or Should Have?" The sports behemoth's watchdog affirms that he favors the latter--more Michael Sam, Richie Incognito, debates over the N-word, and handwringing over sports concussions. It's merely boring that ESPN shifts from sports to essentially political debates. It's dishonest that ESPN deals with disputes as though they aren't. A controversy, by definition, doesn't elicit unanimity. Read my article @ Breitbart Sports on how debate on ESPN plays more like a monologue.

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25 / March
25 / March
John Dickinson, the Opposite of Chickenhawk

John Dickinson remains famous, and infamous, for two brave acts. He refused to sign the Declaration of Independence. Then he fought in the War for Independence that he had sought to avert. Read my review of William Murchison's The Cost of Liberty: The Life of John Dickinson @ the American Spectator.

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23 / March
23 / March
Neither Big Nor East

The Big East's Creighton advanced in the NCAA tournament this weekend. How does a small school in Nebraska qualify as "Big East"? If you came of age during the 1980s--wore out an Atari 2600, watched Martha Quinn introduce Nena's "99 Luftballoons," rode in the back of the family station wagon--and displayed even a remote interest in sports, then Big East basketball played as a big deal. But it doesn't now, which is why ESPN's 30 for 30 aired "A Requiem for the Big East." Read my article @ Breitbart Sports on how a made-for-TV league became a TV casualty.

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